EUROPOLIS AS A LIEU DE MEMOIRE: DO WE HAVE TO BE TERRIFIED BY JEAN BART’S PROPHECY?

Evropolis 4
Standard

Published in: Roads and trails of the Europeanism in the Balkans, Sofia: Institute of Balkan Studies, Veliko Turnovo: Faber, 2014, pp.390-395.

In his documentary film Europolis: the Town of the Delta, the director Kostadin Bonev resurrected the curious story of the Romanian town Sulina situated in the delta of Danube. Many years before the European Union to be founded, this city epitomized the European dream. It was possible because after the Crimean War’s end in 1856, Sulina was granted ‘free town’ status under the rule of European commission, French was the official language, and the town became the third largest port in the region symbolically defined as ‘the little Venice of the Orient’.

read more

SEARCHING FOR AN ENTHRALLING SONG

Whose Is This Song?
Standard

Since Adela Peeva’s documentary Whose Is This Song came out in 2003, it proved to be a great success at numerous film festivals[1] all over the world. The film succeeded both in drawing the attention of connoisseurs and in receiving a warm welcome from a wider audience. Actually, the latter was more important in the context of the dramatic decline of Bulgaria’s film industry during the last fifteen years, when filmmakers were forced to work under harsh conditions and had to comply with new political agendas and business standards. In this unfavourable situation Adela Peeva was among those who quickly discovered that their key dominant themes lived up to the changing audience expectations. Having presented the specific problems of Bulgaria’s ethnic Turks in her previous production The Unwanted (1999) and thus having clearly stated her interest in dealing with specific Balkan issues[2], Peeva ventured into another exciting project – Whose Is This Song – which focused on a different yet related topic.

read more